A crown on your tooth is meant to protect and strengthen it for lifelong use. There are a few materials that dentists can use for such crowns—each achieves the purpose of a crown but comes with different benefits and procedures that are worth exploring! Here are some details about crown materials and their benefits for your consideration.

Metal

Metals were some of the first materials ever used to create a crown for a damaged tooth. These include nickel, palladium, chromium, and of course, gold. The aesthetic of this material is not as appealing as others, as the metallic color is starkly contrasted to the surrounding teeth and can draw attention to the obvious crown. However, metals are strong and malleable enough that they almost never break or even chip, and their lifespan is longer than other materials. Biting and chewing can put a lot of pressure on your teeth, especially back molars… with a metal crown, however, this pressure is of little to no concern (and the metal is out of sight, making it a bit more ideal as a crown option!)

Porcelain/Ceramics

For front teeth, a crown that matches the look of your actual tooth is important! This is where porcelain or ceramic crowns may be most beneficial. The hard inner core of a ceramic tooth can be capped with porcelain, creating a smooth color match… ceramics are also more durable than pure porcelain, meaning the use of both can strengthen the durability of the crown. Because it is made of a synthetic, rock-like substance, the tooth is able to handle normal pressures from chewing and biting, but it is more at risk of chipping or cracking. Still, these issues are infrequent and easily repairable.

Resin

Resin crowns are able to mimic tooth color and texture well. The material is similar to that used for regular fillings. The biggest benefit of resin is its price—the polymer is inexpensive to manufacture and therefore easily accessible, and easily used for crowns. This makes it significantly cheaper than metal or porcelain. However, resin crowns are more likely to wear down, chip, or break after long term use. Again, its ease of access makes it also easy to repair or replace!

Some crown materials are worth enough to be resold to companies like Crownbuyers! Think yours may be worth something? Visit us today to find out!