First, a little history

It may be interesting to know that gold dental crowns were first used over nineteen hundred years ago. While other metals have been used, gold has been a material of choice for almost all-metal crowns for centuries.

Who buys gold crowns?

  • There are many businesses with websites offering to buy dental gold. Many buy dental scrap directly from individuals as well as from dental offices.
  • Individuals can also find gold buyers and pawn shops in most cities that may buy gold crowns along with jewelry and other metals.
  • As an individual seller of one or a few gold crowns or bridges, it is typically best to work with a business accustomed to small amounts of those materials. Such refiners specialize in performing single crown assays cost efficiently and, therefore, can pay more.

1How do they determine the value of your gold crown or bridge?

  • Gold crowns and bridges are constructed with dental metal alloys that vary greatly in gold content. They may be anywhere from 10 karat to 18 karat gold. (24 karat is pure gold.) The average is 11.5 karat or 47.9% gold.
  • The weight and metal content of the crown/bridge plus current market price of gold will determine what the refiner can pay.
  • Other metals used in dental gold alloys include palladium, silver, chrome, nickel, copper, tin, etc. Some of these and other trace metals interact with gold in such a way that it is very difficult to capture all of the gold in the refining process. Unfortunately, some gold crowns present a gold color but have little or no gold content.
  • Since karat values vary greatly, an assay is necessary for an accurate valuation. In most cases, assaying a single gold crown is often not cost efficient for larger refiners and gold buying businesses – local or online.
  • After the assaying and purchasing a crown, buyers will add a single crown to a larger batch of material in order to more efficiently refine the metals.
  • Sellers should only deal with buyers that will give a quote, allow the seller time to accept or decline, and return the crown/bridge if seller declines.

What can you expect to receive for your gold crown or bridge?

  • Due to the broad variation in the market price for gold, different metal alloys used, and the actual weight of crowns, the value per crown may vary from value if they have no gold content, to as much as $200, with most in the range of $40 to $90 each.
  • Bridges are usually heavier and therefore usually have higher values than single gold crowns.